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Domenico Scola + Arlene Gibbs + Nicola Ferlei-Brown + Jessica Stewart + Katie Parla + Odette LaFrance + Patricia Winton + Sienna Reid + Ren Mattioli + Elizabeth Helman Minchilli Rick Breco + Lisa Tucci + Rosa Manocchio + Diane Epstein+ John Nolan +Jeanettte Montgomery Barron + Chen Clarke + Amii Stewart + Rochelle Cheever + Vincenzo Racana + Cynthia Korzekwa + Beverly Lewis + Alex Mackenzie + Tess Amodeo-Vickery +   Agnes Crawford

ARCHIVES ONE: Megan Fitzgerald + Lynn Apple + Elizabeth Abbot +Yvonne Fisher + Kathleen Ann Morris +Rebecca Spitzmiller +Mike Applebaum + Gail Milissa Grant + Laura Ellen Antinucci + Rudhra Kapur + Vibeke Gurholt + Yuko Tesshi + Pascale Ferry Phoebe Lesch + Elaine O'Reilly

ARCHIVES TWO: Sally Sontheimer
+ Nicole Franchini + Alan Ovson + Yasmin Ergas + Sydney and Michael Cresci + Bobby McDuffie+ Robert Brodie Booth + Brando Crespi + Maureen B. Fant + Susan Doull + Nina Gardener + Milton Gendel +Fiamma Arditi + Wendy Auslebrook + Romina Power + Edna Goldfield + Elisabeth Giansiracusa + Ann Joyce + Jonathan Turner

Interactive Rome Map

If you've ever wondered what it would be like to live in Rome, or if you live in Rome and wonder what life is like for your fellow expatriates, you'll enjoy meeting a few of the people who have succesfully settled in the Eternal City.

by Renée Finch

Elizabeth Knight was born in Birmingham, Alabama and raised in Nashville, Tennessee. She holds Bachelor’s degrees in Italian Studies and Communications (Cinema), from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, and a Doctorate in Jurisprudencefrom Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as a Certificate in Chinese Law from the East China University of Politics and Law in Shanghai. A big fan of academics, she is currently finishing up a Master of Business Administration in Finance here in Rome.   
Liz's love for Italy started with a typical family vacation during the summer after high school. Her first day in Rome she told her skeptical mother that she intended to move here as soon as possible. Over the next few years, she  adamantly set herself to  learning Italian, from renting  Italian movies and  watching  them with tape covering the subtitles, to subscribing to Italian magazines, and  every summer, she returned to Italy to study in Rome and Siena. Three weeks after graduating from college, she moved to Italy with the intention of staying for one year, but remained for four. It was the time of her life. Only her sense of responsibility made her go back to the  USA to become a lawyer.  After  practicing civil litigation in Texas for four years, she  moved back to Rome to start her own legal practice where she works remotely for US clients. She is also a travel writer and blogger at romeifyouwantto.com

What is the most captivating thing about Rome for you
It is a living museum. Around every corner there is something ancient and remarkable, and I will never take it for granted.
Has your coming to stay in Rome enhanced your work experience?
It has very much enhanced my work experience, which makes up for the decline in my paycheck. In the States, I was an attorney. I am still an attorney here, working remotely for U.S. clients, but I’m branching out into travel writing which is heaps of fun. Getting to see the sunshine and consume delicious food and wine (and write about it) is priceless.

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
The Basilica of San Clemente is my favorite historical site in Rome, but most tourists on the typical four-day visit miss it. It’s right behind the Colosseum [via Labianca 95] so it couldn’t be easier to get to. A medieval basilica sits on top of an even more ancient basilica, on top of even more ancient Roman residences. You can hear the water running through underground aqueducts that have been used for thousands of years. I’m more of a history buff than an art buff, and this is the kind of thing that gives me chills.

Where do you go in Rome to chill out?
My own rooftop terrace overlooking St. Peter’s dome, with a bottle of wine and some cheese!

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?
Probably performing stand-up comedy with Rome’s Comedy Club. Living here, the material writes itself. Apart from that, little things, like the first time I drove my own motorino by myself.

Is there something that annoys you about Rome
?
The usual stuff: can’t return things things to stores, can’t find good Mexican food. It’s mostly that things puzzle me, not annoy me, like why do grown men fill their car windows with stuffed animals?

What is your favorite restaurant?
Ristorante alla Rampa in Piazza di Spagna [Piazza Mignanelli 18, tel 06 678 2621]. It may not be the most delicious food in Rome, but for being in the middle of such a drool-worthy location, it’s very good and affordable. Best mozzarella-stuffed zucchini flowers in town (and my Roman friend Novella agrees). It also has a very clean above-ground restroom!

How would someone from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?
You would certainly learn a good bit of Italian in a few years. And if you’re from anywhere other than New York (where you may already be used to this), you will learn that you don’t actually need a double oven or giant refrigerator, or even a car. Okay, maybe in Dallas you do need a car. But, you’ll learn that you don’t actually need a lot of the stuff you thought you did in the States.

When is the best time to visit?
I like May! The temperature is perfect and the countryside is crayon green if you have time for some day trips out of town.

Domenico Scola was born and raised in Haddon Heights, New Jersey, a small town suburb of Philadelphia. In 2000, shortly after earning a degree in accounting from the University of Richmond, he came to Italy in search of his Italian roots, and never left. He initiallty found work at FAO, the United Nations Food and Agritculture Organization. But he eventtually quit his job to follow his passion for music full-time, acting as the front man for a Rolling Stones tribute band (known by various names such as Crazy Fish and The Stoners). The group, based in Rome, played Boston, Washington DC, Berkeley, Austin, and throughout Italy. Recently, Domenico launched Tram Tracks, a ninety-minute evening tram tour of Rome with food, wine and live rock music, which he thinks of as a "party in motion." The band plays rock covers of the Beatles, Adriano Celentano plus Italian International hits (“Volare”, “That’s’ Amore”).. RomeTramTracks 

What is the most captivating thing about Rome for you? 

There is an energy in this city – you see it and feel it.  You see it as you watch Romans. They have passion in everything they do. Romans love each other. They probably wouldn’t admit it, but you see it as you watch them interact with each other.

Has coming to stay in Rome enhanced your work experience?

Well, I don’t really have any work experience outside of Rome. . . or according, to my father, I don’t have any work experience whatsoever! But all joking aside, yes it has. Living in Rome, I have realized that life is not about work and making money — and I mean I really learned it. I gave up a “professional position” at FAO, a job that any Roman would kill for. I had great benefits and was making TONS of money. But I gave it up to follow my dream, follow my passion , to attempt to make a full -time living as a singer.

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?  
Without a doubt, I would tell a visitor that he must see “Rome by night.“ All the monuments are beautifully illuminated.

Where do you go in Rome to chill out? 
I love the neighborhoods of San Lorenzo and Trastevere. I love just chilling out with friends in a piazza. If I actually go to a bar, it's Locanda Atlantide in San Lorenzo — amazing fun times — or Freni e Frizioni in Trastevere and, of course, Circolo degli Artisti in Pigneto.

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?
Probably singing a duet with Bob Dylan “When I Paint My Masterpiece” on the Tram Tracks.  Singing the lyrics “well the streets of Rome are paved with rubble” along with Bob, while looking over the Circo Massimo — that was pretty amazing. Grazie, Bob!

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?
I love Rome. All of the things that expatriates often complain about — the traffic, the bureaucracy — I don’t mind those things. I love them. That's life in Rome. If you don’t like those aspect,s well, go back to where you’re from. I guess if there was one complaint I have, it’s that Romans don’t like to go out if its raining, especially if its cold in the winter.

What is your favorite restaurant? 
Claudio “Il Bruttone” on via Taranto in San Giovanni is really good and very under-rated. He makes delicious food — some Roman classics and some of his own special dishes, like carbonara with truffles and great “quinto quarto” plates! ["Quinto quarto", the "fifth quarter" of the animal, genearlly refers to offal such as tripe and brains.] Tell him I sent you!

How would someone benefit from coming to Rome for a few years? 
Well, anyone could learn just to enjoy life, to enjoy simple things, time with friends, una passeggiata in centro on a Saturday afternoon, watching La Roma with friends on Sunday, a pizza with friends on any given week night. You run into someone you haven’t seen for years, and instead of saying “I gotta run, but lets get together some day” you actually go to the nearest bar and share a coffee. And you learn that you can enjoy social life not only on Friday and Saturday nights, that it is normal to have little tiny fruit stands throughout the city, which are open every day, where people actually do their shopping and prices are fair, that shopping in ten different stores and supporting local businesses instead of going to big supermarkets is not such a bad thing, that you can enjoy an evening just walking around in a neighborhood or hanging out in a piazzeria instead of spending all your money in some expensive pub.

When is the best time to visit? 
June — great beach weather, great activities organized by the city (the Estate Romana festival) many outdoor clubs, which are open only in the summer, restaurants with outdoor seating, people just hanging out in the piazzas, and you don’t have the tourist rush that you get in July and August.


Agnes Crawford
has spent the last ten years as a Rome guide, while contributing to various guide books, such as Time Out Guide to Rome, the Shopping Guide Where to Wear and Frommer's Italian Islands. She collaborates with Context travel's Archeologial 'Tours in the Public Interest' Rome series, and plans custom tours for clients with special interest. Agnes passionately believe that understanding Rome makes a visit to the city much more meaningful, more enjoyable anymore comfortable.

Her site, understandingrome.com, has been recommended by the New York Times, the Daily Telegraph, Rough Guide to Rome, Condé Nast Traveller's Rome App and the Sydney Sun Herald.
Her blog understandingrome.wordpress.com is dedicated to musings on all things Roman.

What is the most captivating thing about Rome for you?
The palimpsest, century piled upon century

Has coming to stay in Rome enhanced your work experience?
Well, it meant I stumbled into a profession I don't think that I otherwise would have. Rome is an amazing place to be a guide!

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
The Pantheon! Even if you're only in Rome for a few hours, it can't be missed. It's the best preserved Roman building. The scale of the dome is breath-taking. The glorious bling of the coloured stone interior reminds us the Romans weren't minimalists. And it's free! there's no queuing, no complicated reservations. Just roll up and wonder at Roman ingenuity!

Where do you go in Rome to chill out?
If I'm between tours in the Colosseum area, I like to find a spot under a tree in the Vigna Barberini on the Palatine (shhh, don't tell anyone, but it's DESERTED!)

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?
I think Rome provides a great sense of perspective. Rome has seen it all before. But be careful! I had only planned on spending six months here!

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?
If I wanted to, I could find an inordinate number of annoying things, but I prefer to look at the good stuff. I could moan about the parking on the pavements and the relentless bureaucracy ,but I think I've gotten used to it and learned how to play the game. And my local baker, butcher and market guy say "Ciao bella" even if I'm not buying anything. That's got to count for something!
.
What is your favorite restaurant?
Probably my local, Pigneto 41 [Via del Pigneto, 41-43 tel 06 7039 9483] One of the best pasta carbonara dishes around, constantly changing seasonal specials, and friendly service. At the really smart end, a new favorite is also Metamorfosi in Parioli [Via Giovanni Antonelli 30 tel 06 8076839]. I took my husband for his birthday and we're just waiting for another special occasion to go again!

When is the best time to visit?
Late April/early May when the flowers are out, the sun should be shining but it's not too hot. Or late September/early October. If you can run the risk of bad weather late January/ early February is amazing. Midweek you'll have the sights all to yourself!

 

Arlene GibbsArlene Gibbs was born in New York City and grew up in Verona, New Jersey. As a teenager, she spent many summers visiting her grandparents on the Caribbean island of St. Martin. In retropsect, she realizes that she didn't fully apprecaite those visits at the time, but she does now. After graduating from Syracuse University with a bachelor's degree in International Relations, Arlene worked in interior design and politics. She eventualy moved to Hollywood where she worked as a film executive and producer for ten years, on such films as Traitor starring Don Cheadle and Love and Basketball. With Elizabeth Hunter, she co-wrote the film Jumping the Broom (Amore e altri guai), which was successfully released in 2011. She is also the author of the novel The Rebirth of Mrs Tracey. Arlene's first visit to Rome in 2005 changed her life and she continued to return to Italy.   She had always planed to move overseas when she was older or retired, but during shooting the film Traitor on location in Toronto, Marseille and Marakkech changed her mind. She had spent ten years in Los Angeles, but it still didn't feel like home. A viksit to Rome in 2005 changed her life and she continued to return to Italy. Rome was the perfect place to recharge and return to her creative roots. She has written about her move to Italy on her blog nyc/caribbeanragazza.
In 2012, after completing an internship for one of Italy's top interior and furniture designers, she founded her own company, Arlene Gibbs Décor (arlenegibbsdecor.com) . Her design philosophy of stylish simplicity is strongly influenced by living in Italy and her Caribbean background. She collaborates with her clients to find beautiful, timeless pieces that reflect their individuality. Every home tells a story, and Arlene strives to create spaces that flow well and enrich her client’s lifestyles while complementing the architecture of their homes. She is currently working on projects in Anguilla, Rome, and Tuscany.

What is the most captivating thing about Rome for you?
The light. The art and the architecture.

Has your coming to stay in Rome enhanced your work experience?
Absolutely. I don't think I would be decorating and writing had I not moved here.

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
There is so much to see, so I would tell them to give themselves time to just wander. For art lovers, the Villa Borghese museum is a gem, small and fliled with stunning works by Bernini, Caravaggio, etc. (Reservations are required.)

Where do you go in Rome to chill out?
The parks, Villa Pamphilli, Appia Antica, and Villa Borghese

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?
During my first trip to Rome, it was love at first sight. Still don't know why but here am I.

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?.
People not picking up after their dogs. Come on!

What is your favourite restaurant?
Cesare al Casaletto  (via del Casaletto 45, Portuense) — fantastic trattoria
Pierluigi (Piazza de' Ricci near Campo de' Fiori) — known for fish. I love their Insalata Catalana and Spaghetti con Vongole. They also have one of the best bars in town. It's tiny but perfect.
Le Mani in Pasta (Via dei Genovesi, Trastevere) — for well, pasta

How would someone from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?
Even during this time of economic hardship, there is an energy here that is pretty special. For anyone who is creative, I think Rome would be a very inspiring city.

When is the best time to visit?
May-July is the peak of high season. To avoid some of the crowds, I suggest the late fall/winter to visit. The weather can be unpredictable, with plenty of rain. However, you get a better sense of the real city. . August is unbearably hot and the locals leave town.

 

Nicola Ferlei-BrownNicola Ferlei-Brown is a Rome-based British travel writer, passionate about covering stories on where to shop, dine, and find all things divine, in and around the city. She has worked for Wanted In Rome, The Roman Forum Magazine, The Italian Insider, Italy Magazine and Wallpaper City Guides in London. With Italian in her bloodline, she took the road to Rome seven years ago after finishing her BA in Art History and Architecture at Manchester University. Fluent in Italian, she spends her time between Rome and London. She also runs a travel advisory service for tourists wishing to come to Rome.
You can follow Nicola's blog at www.nicolaferleibrown.wordpress.com or visit her websites: www.nicolaferleibrown.com and www.minervatoursrome.com

 
What is the most captivating thing about Rome for you? 
The sounds, the buzz, a constant beat of dramatic murmur. Above all, the food. Being able to enjoy a glass of top notch wine with the best prosciutto is all in a day's work, and being able to be at the lakes or on the beach within thirty minutes without batting an eyelid. These are what captivate and tempt me as a London city girl.
 
Has coming to stay in Rome enhanced your work experience?
Without a doubt. As a writer and photographer, it's an inspiring place to be. Rome just sweats a theatrical vibe, she can't help it, Italians are just so dramatic in the way they express themselves. I love it. Brainstorming ideas, sipping cappuccini, surrounded by Baroque architecture, what a backdrop! It's a beautiful city, and assists my thinking when I  research articles. Being my own boss admittedly grants me time to enjoy my surroundings. It's a medium-sized city, so I am blessed to be able to benefit from the best of both worlds — work and play. I've made contacts and friends that have definitely afforded me a greater work experience. 

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
Where to begin? Gallery Borghese is unmissable. Testaccio food market wouldn't hurt. Lake Nemi for a little dip and some strawberry delicacies, just outside Rome, and the roof terrace at Hotel Raphael [near Piazza Navona] for breath taking panoramic views to help wash down that cocktail. Sculpture-wise, Bernini's 'Ecstasy of Saint Teresa' at Santa Maria delle Vittoria [Via 20 Settembre 17] is mind blowing. If modern architecture floats your boat, don't miss Richard Meier's 'Chiesa di Tor Tre Teste (the "Jubilee" Church, via Prenestina outside the city walls). For Baroque beauties, it may not be by Bernini or Borromini, but I think the mini Church of Santa Maria Maddalena [near the Pantheon] is like a little ruby sparkling in Rome's jewellery box.
 
Where do you go in Rome to chill out? 
Villa Borghese is paradise if I want to gather my thoughts. The back streets around via dei Governo Vecchio are beautiful, too, and finding a quiet bar to sit down and people watch, amidst the mad chit -chatter, is quite addictive. Chiostre Bramante's coffee bar [Piazza della Pace near Piazza Navona] is a blissful afternoon escape if you want to be inconspicuous with wifi and tea. Or the Arciliuto lounge bar [Piazza Montevecchio 5, near Piaza Navona] is another little chill out zone.
 
What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?
Well, getting hit by a drunk Sicilian taxi driver was a memorable experience. My bicycle was even stolen at the scene of the crime, I mean, you couldn't make it up. And then I met the man who owns the O in the Hollywood sign in the A and E room as an added bonus. Getting to meet and interview John Grisham under a full moon in the Roman Forum was an awesome experience. Also seeing Valentino's red gown exhibition at the Ara Pacis is a fond memory. I've got one for every day of the week, there are good ones and bad ones that could fill a book.

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?
Yeah, ha, coffee bar queues and trying to decipher which one applies! That, plus not being able to wear your best shoes to Trastevere unless you are a trained tightrope, tiptoeing specialist. [Because of the bad cobblestones.] Wanting to buzz about on a red Vespa, but not daring to go there. But these are small snippets of irritation worth enduring to live in such a beautiful place.
 
What is your favorite restaurant? 
Pizzeria Nuovo Mondo in Testaccio [Via Amerigo Vespucci 15]. Hands down best for people watching and munching on their Pizza Messicana.
 
How would someone coming from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years? 
You would benefit being surrounded by beautiful architecture, art, mind-blowing monuments, beautiful people and great menus. But I would say you would need years really, to delve into the true Roman experience. Rome is unbelievable. It's unique, and seeing is believing, so you have to live it.
 
When is the best time to visit? 
I would say May or December. May for the sun without the burn, and December for the lights and smells. Roasting chestnuts, beautifully lit streets, the atmosphere.

 

Jessica Stewart, who was born in Hopkinton, Massachusetts, was inspired to study art history during a high school trip to Italy. After graduating from Boston University, she continued her studies in Padova. She found herself feeling so comfortable in Italy, she decided to make Rome her home. She works with Context Travel, and shares her photographs of the Eternal City through her RomePhotoBlog.com, as well as shooting for publications such as The Guardian, La Repubblica, the SAS inflight magazine, and others, as well as organizing art and cultural events, such as the Hope and Resurrection photography project. She participated in the CNN special “Go: Roma”, in which she was folloed through the streets of Pigneto, and discussed the city’s street art; and in the presentation “InvadeRoma,” organized by organized by the Wunderkammen Altroquando bookstore in Rome. Her work is included in the book 'Roma Creativa' sponsored by the Province of Rome. Her work has been exhinited in various venues, most recently at the Artekne Art Fair in Potenza, and in collective exhibits in London, Tehran and the USA. In October, 2012, she will participate in an exhibition of street art photography at Garagezero (Via Treviri).
info@romephotoblog.com  romephotoblog.com

What is the most captivating thing about Rome for you?
I think it has to be the light that you find in Rome. I travel quite a bit, and for some reasonm the quality of light and the colors and shadows that are cast give a special feeling to the city.

Has coming to stay in Rome enhanced your work experience?
Of course. Coming to Rome for me wasn't something I thought about as a lifestyle choice to last for a few years, it was a permanent decision, and I think I've been able to marry my cultural background as an American quite well with some of the Italian sensibilities that help me really stop and savor life.

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
I would absolutely tell people to go to the Galleria Borghese. It's by far my favorite collection in Rome. Just make sure you call to make a reservation in advance, as they only let a limited number of people inside at a time. You won't regret it. The Bernini sculptures alone are breathtaking.

Where do you go in Rome to chill out?
I love the relaxed, neighborhood atmosphere of Pigneto. The pedestrian island can get a bit chaotic for me, but I like to grab a drink with friends at Bar Rosi, right at the end by the Circonvallazione Casilina. It's nothing fancy — just plastic tables outside — but it's a gathering point for people who live in the neighborhood and the owners are real characters.

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?
It's hard to narrow down to just one thing really, so much has happened over the years. Probably one of the funniest was during the first year here when I was just leaving work and saw a high speed motorcycle chase down our quiet street. It scared me to death because I didn't realize until shortly after that it was actually undercover police chasing a thief and not just some maniacs riding around.

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?
The traffic! It really makes things take so much longer when you are trying to travel around. That is definitely a trial in patience and it would be great if the city could implement better public transit to really work out some of the issues.

What is your favorite restaurant?
This is tough. I have a lot of foodie friends and so I usually defer to them, plus a lot of places are good for a few years and then get expensive, change owners, or quality goes down. One longstanding place that I love for a good pizza is Alle Carrette on via Madonna dei Monti. It's big enough that there are always free tables and they have a small section for outdoor seating. The pizza is traditional and good and I love the fritti .

How would someone coming from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?
I think doing any time abroad is beneficial, just to open up your horizons and make you more understanding and aware of the cultural differences and commonalities we all share. It's definitely not something that is easy to do, so it might not be for everyone, but if you are willing to take the risk, I think there are big rewards.

When is the best time to visit?
I would say November or February/March. It's the off season so crowds are low compared to the rest of the year and the weather is still enjoyable.

 

Cara Kavanaugh grew up in Port Orchard, Washington across Puget Sound from Seattle. She studied classical ballet with the Pacific Northwest Ballet and became a professional dancer while still in high school. While completing a BA in Comparative Literature. she went off to Sweden to study the plays of Strindberg at the Universitetet i Stockholm. Now in love with Europe but ready to escape the long nordic winter, she visited Italy and discovered paradise. She was recruited by the Fashion modeling agency in Milan, then moved from modeling into performing with an experimental theatre company, La Comuna Baires. Now an actress, she moved to Rome for the film and television opportunities, as well as a chance to study the Strasberg Method with F. De Sapio and D. De Fazio. She then did the sensible thing and moved to Los Angeles to train with famed acting coach Milton Katselas and continue her career, but once there, she suffered reverse culture shock  and sought out Italians for comfort. Still, she stayed for five years, working in TV episodics (such as Veronica's Closet, and Pacific Blue), as well as commercials for Matell's Barbie doll. Her day job was bilingual: producing for RAI international and RAI Uno.
A serious accident brought her back to Rome's historic center in search of a car-free lifestyle. Private Pilates sessions literally put her back on her feet. While still afflicted with chronic pain from her injuries, she was able to recover enough to become a certified Pilates instructor. The training included a 700-hour apprenticeship in the US with Master Teacher Dorothee Vande Walle, teacher-trainer for Romana Kryzanowska. a well respected Joseph Pilates protégée. This last year, she founded a studio in Parioli, Pilates Muse (www.pilatesmuse.com).
She has resumed her acting career as well, collaborating with the Italian composer M. Squillante and an international cast for the opera The Wings of the Dedaelus, and most recently as the lead in M. Crimp's Cruel + Tender at the Teatro Litta in Milan. In film, she has worked alongside Vincent Gallo, Ernest Borgnine and Burt Young in Olivero Rising, and she is currently filming the experimental web series Alt Qvm. She has also taught at Rome's Link-European Academy of Dramatic Arts and the Beats Academy in Tivioli. 

What is the most captivating thing about Rome for you?
The layers of history and culture that abound everywhere you look. It is an eternal mystery to be solved, symbols to decode, historical eras to understand and artists to recognize. I am never bored and I'm always cheered by contact with the Romans. Every outing becomes an adventure. You never know whom you will meet or where you will end up.

Has coming to Rome enhanced your work experience?
It has certainly been interesting to act in another language. It can be very frustrating working out your accent and trying to get the diction right, but it is also an advantage — from necessity your communication becomes basic and essential and in a certain sense, more true. Your are less able to be sophisticated in your second language, so you have to actually live strongly the message you are trying to convey.

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
Aimless strolls in the historic center, taking the time to just absorb its mystery and discover its charm for yourself.

Where do you go in Rome to chill out?
I love tucking into dark, cool churches and spending quiet personal time in the still and ancient space. I also like walking in the parks Villa Borghese and Villa Ada. Then, of course, my favorite Roman pastime is sitting at an outdoor café and just people watching.

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?
Filming in Cinecitta on the same sound stage that Fellini used. I loved hearing stories directly from the memories of people who have worked with great Italian filmmakers like Fellini, Leone and Bertolucci. Other great memories are in the historic Italian theaters, working on the same stages as La Duse. I got shivers reading the plaque backstage that commemorates her performance of Ibsen's WIld Duck with music by Edvard Grieg, who was present at the time.

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?.
Dirty public bathrooms, if any at all, and undependable public transit.

What is your favourite restaurant?
It depends on the season and the mood. In the summer it could be sitting in some of my favorite piazzas — Ricci, Campo de Fiori, della Quercia, Farnese, Santa Maria in Trastevere, della Rotunda — the places are so beautiful I'm happy with anything and a little wine. In the winter, I like places that are varied, from Glass in Trastevere, all'Oro in Parioli, to Casa delle Coppelle, Settembrini, or even Hamasei for sushi, osterie like Beltramme, La Taverna del Ghetto, and da Sergio, bistros like Cul di Sac, Pizza dar Poeta, Oblitorio or Montecarlo, for fish Eleonora D'Arborea and Pierluigi, and for meat I like Ciak, i Butteri, and Mangiafuoco because they have chianina, US Black Angus and Scottish Black Angus beef.

How would someone from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?
You learn quickly to let go of your preconceived ideas about how things should work and have to learn a new system that seems totally illogical but makes sense to the Romans... remind yourself: when in Rome do as the Romans do! You will grow out of old mental habits and learn to be tenacious and flexible at the same time. It is very good training for traveling in many other cultures. If you have ever noticed Italians abroad, they often seem to be able to communicate and get by even if they don't speak the language. Roman culture and street life develops an acute sense of social intelligence.

When is the best time to visit?
I like the Roman autumn, when it's still sunny and you have beautiful golden light on the ancient buildings and tanned and relaxed Romans who have started to dress in their new city clothes after being at the beach all summer. I also like the fall cuisine with artichokes, mushrooms and truffles topping the list.

Katie Parla grew up in Princeton, New Jersey. but her roots are in Lucania, Sicily. Her family has been in the restaurant business for decades, and her father owns a restaurant specializing in wild game. She earned her B.A.in History of Art focusing on Roman art and archaeology at Yale University, then moved to Rome in 2003, where she earned a Master's degree in Italian Gastronomic Culture at the Università degli Studi di Roma 'Tor Vergata', and become certified by the Italian Sommelier Federation (FISAR). She is currently an urban speleologist for the city of Rome, the producer of five episodes for the History Channel series 'Cities of the Underworld', in which she also appeared as an on-screen expert in Rome, Palermo and Naples. She has written, edited and contributed to 20 guide books, including publications for National Geographic, The Rough Guide, Time Out, DK Eyewitness Guides, Fodors and the Encyclopedia of Society and Culture in the Ancient and Medieval Worlds. In Rome, Katie offers food tours and wine and beer tastings, as well as cultural tours all over Southern Italy. She says her tours tend to be interdisciplinary, since it's almost impossible to isolate single themes in a place like Rome where so many layers intermingle. On a food tour, the discussion might start with artichokes, then turn to botanical archaeology, then frescoes depicting vegetation.(www.katieparla.com). She writes a food blog (www.parlafood.com) and has created an app, "Katie Parla's Rome for Foodies", a collection of 150 venues including restaurants, pizzerias, wine bars, craft beer pubs, gelato shops, and bakeries (www.romeforfoodies.com).

What is the most captivating thing about Rome for you?
Industrial archeology like Gazometro, the ex-Mattatoio and the Central Montemartini are intriguing to me.

Has coming to Rome enhanced your work experience?
It has made me the supreme multi-tasker. To make it here you have to keep many irons in the fire.

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
Regardless of the season, don’t miss gelato at Il Gelato di Claudio Torce [Piazza Monte D'Oro 91/92, historic center], Fatamorgana [Piazza degli Zingari 5, Monti], or Neve di Latte [Via Luigi Poletti 6, Flaminia]. Also, the Baths of Caracalla are amazing and have relatively few visitors.

Where do you go in Rome to chill out?
Well considering it is summer, I go to literally chill out at the Piscina delle Rose, an Olympic-sized swimming pool at EUR. I hop on the Metro B at the Colosseum and in just over 20 minutes I can be lounging poolside.

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?
Definitely feeling the aftershocks of the earthquake in 2009. They were very light but totally freaked me out!

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?
There are a few things, but the most aggravating is how aggressive/homicidal taxi and bus drivers are to cyclists. I love biking in Rome but it is possibly the most dangerous city for this way to get around and it’s a shame because Rome is beautiful viewed from two wheels.

What is your favourite restaurant?
Mesob [Via Prenestina, 118 Ethiopian food], Glass [Vicolo dè Cinque 58,Trastevere, tel 06 5833 5903], Metamorfosi [Via Giovanni Antonelli, 30/32, Parioli, tel 06 8076839] and Pizzarium [via della Meloria 43, Prati, tel 06 3974 5416] tie for my favorite places to eat.

How would someone from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?
It would teach them infinite patience. Rome is a great place on the surface, but not a simple place to live, particularly for a foreigner. The first few years either make you or break you!

When is the best time to visit?
I love Rome in early November, when the days are still a bit warm, but not yet too cold

Odette Lafrance was born in Repentingny Montreal, Canada, where she grew up surrounded by nature. As a child, she had the freedom to explore her environment, sketching whatever caught her eye while dreaming of the future. When her parents gave her a mini sewing machine, she began making dresses for her dolls, teaching herself a creative skill that would later become her own label 'By Odette': byodette.wordpress.com 
Odette studied Visual Communication at the College Ahuntsic in Montreal and began her career as Corporate Branding Designer for the company Ove Design in Montreal, creating logos and promotions, designing calenders, children's products and decorations for an international clientele. Her continued search for artistic inspiration brought her to Rome. She fell in love with the quality of the light in Italy, and was naturally drawn towards the landscape and culture. She remained here and raised a family.
She set up her own marketing and communications company in Rome, where she works creating trade show graphics, websites and special events. Food and wine producers have comissioned her designs, and her works were shown at the Sapori d'Italia Expo in New York 2011.  
Her abstract and pop art works, which are influenced by Matisse, Lichtenstein, Rothko and  other 20th century artists, have been exhibited in many cities in Italy, as well as in London  and Tel Aviv. A sample of her work can be seen at www.ol4.it
Odette is also interested in the healing arts, and has made a study of correct diet, sacred geometry, self-healing, alchemy and the kabala. She is a certified practitioner of THETA Healing. 

What is the most captivating thing about Rome for you?
The culture, the architecture and  the beauty everywhere around you, together with the lifestyle — enjoying good food and wines.

Has coming to stay in Rome enhanced your work experience?

I’ve changed my point of view towards my work. There is a passionate way of integrating all the cultural aspects of Italy
and Europe. It opened my mind to new way of doing and appreciating things.

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
Piazza Navona and Fontana di Trevi (a wish with the coin so you can come back!!). To enjoy fooling around in the
center of the city , tasting new food and wines, appreciating its beauty.

Where do you go in Rome to chill out?
Strolling in the center, eating in restaurants in Trastevere or Via delle Coppelle.

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?
I met my husband in a restaurant!! And I had my two kids!!

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?
Chaos and traffic jams, and of course it’s dirty in many areas.

What is your favorite restaurant?
I know many, but the most recent one I’ve enjoyed is “Casa delle Coppelle” half French-half Italian. [Piazze delle Coppelle 49, near the Pantheon. tel 06 68 89 1707]

How would someone coming from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?
By learning about a new culture, a new way of living.

When is the best time to visit?
For the best weather I would say May and June together with September and October All the boutiques and restaurants are open, whereas in August all the best ones can be 'chiuso per ferie', a pity, and the weather is too much!!.


 

Patricia Winton was born and raised in Tennessee, receiving received a Master's degree in Englishwhere from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. From a very young age, she combined her love of cooking and reading mystery stories, having received a gift of 'The Bobbsey Twins' books. By her early teens, she was already winning awards for her culinary endeavours and teaching cooking classes at Chesapeake College as well as writing a weekly newspaper column about food for several Maryland newspapers. Her first visit to Italy was in 1969-1972, three years spent in Tuscany learning Italian. Back in the USA, she taught English at American universities and worked as a writer and publicist for nonprofit organizations specializing in education, politics and the arts. Her profession lead her to interview and write about governors and congressmen, painters and business executives, laborers and teachers, plumbers and nurses.
Now that she has made Rome her home, she writes traditional mysteries against a background of the Italian culinary scene. Her protagonist is an American journalist who teams up with a professor of Italian culinary history to get an inside look at the world of Italian food, but dead bodies keep interrupting their quest! 'Feeding Frenzy', a short story featuring the pair, appears in the anthology Fish Tales, (Wildside Press, March 2011).
www.PatriciaWinton.com Blog: www.ItalianIntrigues.blogspot.com

What is the most captivating thing about Rome for you?

Do I have to restrict myself to one? First, as a native of a comparatively new country, I’m awed by the antiquity. To be able to reach out and touch a structure that’s been standing for millennia takes my breath away. Second, the colors of the buildings in residential neighborhoods—the dusty pinks, the ochers—provide an ever-changing visual delight as the sky shifts from brilliant sunshine to dull gray. And perhaps most fascinating of all, the markets where the fish are laid out on ice like jewels on velvet; where the butchers whack carcasses with giant knives in a drumbeat rhythm; where the fresh vegetables and fruit lure me to buy more than I can eat.

Has coming to stay in Rome enhanced your work experience?
For a long time, I’ve toyed with the notion of writing mystery fiction. I’ve plotted and researched numerous ideas over the years, often as a non-lethal way of seeking revenge against people who had annoyed me. The neighbor who made my life unbearable, the co-worker who sabotaged my pet project, and the public official who did bastardly deeds all stood within the sights of my pen. But this was never serious work. In Rome, I’ve merged two of my passions, Italy and food, to create a cast of characters and plot lines that derive from Roman and Italian settings. Hence, my work as a writer has become more serious, and I hope will become more successful. My first published work with these elements is “Feeding Frenzy,” a short story featuring the Trevi Fountain, fish soup, and blood (Fish Tales Wildside Press, 2011). I’m working on a novel with the same protagonists.

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
Two churches that receive little, if any, ink in guidebooks are both jewels. The first, Sant’Ivo, the better known of the two, stands across the Corso del Rinascimento from Piazza Navona. A baroque masterpiece by Borromini dating from the mid-1600s, the church is a geometric puzzle set in a tiny space. Unfortunately, opening hours are highly restricted at the moment. The second, Santa Bibiana, clings to a sliver of land squeezed between Termini Station and the tracks to Frosinone. Initially built in 467, the current facade was Gian Lorenzo Bernini’s first commission from Pope Urban VIII. Inside you find a bronze statue of Santa Bibiana (Bernini) and frescoes by Pietro da Cortona and Agostino Ciampelli. Santa Bibiana is the scene of one of the murders I’m plotting.

Where do you go in Rome to chill out?
I love walking in the Parco degli Acquedotti. The majestic arches of the aqueduct march across fields where dogs and children frolic. Private vegetable gardens shielded from public view huddle in one remote corner. Walking and cycling paths criss-cross the fields and quiet benches under shade trees rest near ubiquitous nasone fountains. Cuddling up to this ancient site is a new chichi golf course built on agricultural land, and beyond that the train speeds to Naples. This melding of the ancient and the new echoes Italian history.

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?

Having the tables turned by a Roman gladiator! As any tourist soon realizes, gladiator impersonators wearing chintzy costumes offer to have their pictures taken with you for a fee at all major sightseeing spots. A couple of years ago, I came upon a film crew in the Parco degli Acquedotti doing a movie about some ancient Roman battle. A vast set with the general’s tent, various kinds of equipment, including a camp kitchen, dotted the fields around the aqueduct. Scores of film extras dressed in beautiful gladiator costumes with authentically designed sandals, crisp tunics, and brass-looking breastplates milled about. As I approached, one of them whipped out a digital camera from beneath his tunic and asked me to take his photo because he wanted a record of his day as a film actor-extra. I only wish I’d had a camera to have my picture taken with that army behind me.

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?
In Rome (and Italy in general), it’s the inefficiency. Cashiers never have change and grill you like a prosecutor to make sure you don’t have the correct amount lurking in your pocket. And wherever you go for bureaucratic paperwork, the clerk hunts with one finger on a QWERTY keyboard to try to tap out your name and other vital information. I long to reach across the table and do it myself. I’m sure bureaucratic delays would be reduced by at least 50 percent if the clerks learned to type! But of course, these traits make the Italian people interesting and amusing, so I try to stifle my annoyance and laugh.

What is your favourite restaurant?
It’s hard to have a bad meal in Italy if you avoid obvious tourist spots. I theorize that restaurateurs don’t expect to see tourists again, so they don’t make an effort. Italian people have rigorous standards, and the chefs put their energies into pleasing them. I always look for a place where lots of Italian people are eating. I’ve been known to look around for a group of Italians out for the evening and follow them into a restaurant. It’s never failed me.

How would someone coming from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?
Living in a country differs from visiting it. For anyone who’s developed a love affair during vacations here, I would recommend a move if you really want to know the culture. You peel away at Rome in layers, and it takes time to savor each one.

When is the best time to visit?
Rome varies with the seasons. The ebb and flow of life here bends to the weather, and the food on Italian tables reflects what’s fresh from the farm that month. In winter, the piazzas are perfumed with roasting chestnuts, and in summer icy granite cool you and quench your thirst. I’d avoid August because real Romans flee the city; by the same token, I might avoid February and its usual rain.

Tess Amodeo-VickeryTess Amodeo-Vickery grew up in Amherst, New Hampshire. She was selected by Duke University to attend the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies Program in Rome, where studied archaeology and art of the Renaissance and Baroque periods, and later received a Squire Fund Grant to further her studies here, ultimately gradutating with honors from Wesleyan College. Back in the States, she formed a jazz duo, ?Lady Brett with her pianist partner. They began playing gigs across the east coast and now perform in Rome,, most often at the Cotton Club. She also works as a guide for Clam Tours, is the European fashion editor of Runway Passport, a global digital platform, and has worked for documentarian Brando Quilici as associate producer on films for the National Geographic and Discovery channels.
Listen to her sing on Youtube.

What is the most captivating thing about Rome for you?
I love that even after two years of living here, not counting the six months when I studied and wrote my thesis, I still get lost on the narrow cobblestoned streets and discover something new and beautiful around every corner. For a dreamer, Rome is the perfect place.

Has coming to Rome enhanced your work experience?
I've met several professional goals to Rome. The first is that I successfully supported myself as a musician. The second is that I revisited my undergraduate degree and applied all the knowledge I gathered from the Wesleyan classics department and ICCS program to collaborate on a successful tour business, Clam Tours, which was something I felt I owed myself to achieve. Finally, I had a terrific new job experience working in film production for two of the largest documentary distributors in the US. And to think that people told me I was heading to Rome to put off the real world!

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
My absolute favorite church is Santa Prassede [Via Santa Prassede 9/A in the Monti district]. It’s a tiny nook of a church, completely hidden from view, packed with gorgeous early Christian mosaics and relics from the life of Christ.

Where do you go in Rome to chill out?
I love shopping at all the cutting edge boutiques in the Monti district, like Le Nou, or biking to one of Rome's magnificent parks, like Villa Borghese or Villa Doria Pamphili, with a picnic lunch and a good book.

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?
The second week my boyfriend and I were living here, we decided to go out and keep our eyes peeled for potential locations to book our jazz act. On our way home from Piazza Navona, we stumbled across Il Tartarughino, a piano bar on Via della Scrofa. We weren't exactly dressed to the nines and the club was a swanky place with a shiny grand piano and white leather sofas, so when the doorman opened the gate to our hopeful but shabby faces, we were almost turned away. Luckily, Brett managed to communicate that we were musicians, and the jovial owner, Ivan, overheard. "All musicians are welcome at my place, come in!" he called. We sat down and accepted a drink, completely in awe, when he said "So, you're musicians, eh? Why don't you play something for us?" Brett knew "Dream A Little Dream" by heart, so we belted it out. They asked for an encore and luckily Brett also knew "All of Me". and Ivan came over to us smiling. "I'm opening a new club tomorrow night in Testaccio," he told us, "and I'd like you to be my opening act. Show up at 7, don't be late, and clean yourselves up before hand!" This was our big break in Rome and started us out on the jazz circuit playing up to four times a week!

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?
I can't stand the metro system. It's always broken or on strike! Also, Romans don't really seem to grasp the concept of waiting for everyone to get off the train before pushing their way on. I've gotten several crunched toes as a result!

What is your favorite restaurant?
Hostaria Romana, Via del Bocaccio 1, off of Via del Tritone. There's graffiti covering the walls and all the waiters are clowns.

How would someone benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?
It's always beneficial to experience other cultures. I came here not knowing a single word of Italian and now I can speak it fluidly. (I like to say "fluid" instead of "fluent" because I think it takes much more time to become truly fluent in a language.) I've also developed a new way of looking at the world. It's strange, because as an Italian-American on my mom's side of the family, I grew up in the United States identifying myself as an Italian. Now that I've lived here, I've realized just how American I really am

When is the best time to visit?
May and September. The weather is perfect and the streets aren't as packed as they can be in June, July and August

 

Alex MackenzieAlex Mackenzie was born in Chesterfield, UK. From an early age, she loved drawing and making things. She completed the Art Foundation course at Chesterfield College of Art followed by a BA Honours in Visual Arts at the University of Lancaster, and PGCE Art teaching for secondary schools at the Goldsmiths college in London. She has exhibited and taught art in Spain, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Venezuela and of Great Britain. This constant travelling inspired her to experiment with local materials leading to her Expressionist style focusing on layers of color and dynamic line. In Caracas, she became a member of the Curculio de Dibujo, professional artists dedicated to drawing. Her work is in the permanent collections of the Museo de Artes Visuales y del Espacio, Venezuela; Sala Aires de Cordoba, Spain, andher many exhibitions have led to commissions and awards. Marriage to a man who works for the British Council eventually brought her to Rome, where she teaches English (at St. George’s International school) and offers art workshops in Rome.
Her work can be seen online at web.me.com/mackenzi1/alexmackenzie.com/Welcome.html

What is the most captivating thing about Rome for you?
Well, I can't choose one thing. My first impressions of the Fori Romani will stay with me forever: the layer upon layer of building and re-building through the centuries, the haphazard scattered stones and fallen columns around the Piazza Venezia. I remember my children asking if they were allowed to sit on one, it seemed wrong! I still love the incidental discovery of an ancient Roman column built into a Renaissance wall, a half covered arch and the re-using of marble plaques and inscriptions pushed into plaster. However, I am constantly struck by the pine trees. Mostly when driving, it is the sudden silhouette between suburban apartment blocks that catches my breath; they relentlessly twist over walls and reach upwards, even after limbs have been hacked off.

Has your coming to stay in Rome enhanced your work experience?
Of course, every move is an influence. Before living here I painted dance in Spain and Venezuela and I did look for some sort of equivalent here without success. I tried working with statues, because of their posture and movement, but in fact am still searching for the 'right' subject for me here.

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
The Pantheon never ceases to amaze me with its dome letting in the weather. San Clemente's layers of history — it's three churches in one. The parks (Villa Ada and Villa Pamphilli especially) Pizza a taglio while shopping in Prati or on the Corso. Italian ice cream.

Where do you go in Rome to chill out?
The park at Villa Pamphilli on the Janiculum hill, or just our own terrace.

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?
Many summer nights travelling through the historical center on the back of a Vespa, often to and from various cultural events such as contemporary dance, jazz concerts and exhibitions, all in impressive buildings.

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?.
I can't get used to the selfishness on the roads. Many people do not seem to think ahead and so create unpleasant, if not dangerous situations. Journeys are so much more pleasurable with courteous behaviour.
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What is your favorite restaurant?
I am still working my way through them all! But favourite pizza at Dar Poeta, (Vicolo del Bologna 45 in Trastevere). Trattoria La Gensola, (Piazza della Gensola in Trastevere).

How would someone from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?
Well, apart from enjoying the haphazard jumbling together of old and new, the food cannot be beaten for simple quality and taste. I love South East Asian food for its complex mixtures of flavors, but Romans seem to be able to offer such variety with little fuss, using a few well-chosen fresh ingredients.

When is the best time to visit?
Any time except July and August, when the humidity keeps you inside all day. The rest of the year, if there is no cloud cover, the sun can be warm — even in February. It does rain a surprising amount too, but that is unpredictable.

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Beverly Lewis was born in New York, literally on Broadway, to a musical family. Growing up with classical music, blues and jazz, she was naturally to drawn it, and from an early age, she wrote lyrics and sange in several genres. While travelling the world. performing in the USA, to perform in Usa, Brazil, Japan, and Europe, she landed in Rome and fell in love with the city, deciding to make it her home. She sings jazz and blues in Italy and France with her musical director, jazz pianist Antonello Vannucchi and and their BLAV quintet and octet Her latest albums are "My Turn", (with a part two in preproduction), "Live at Classico Village Roma" and "Dear Nicolà", a salute to the great Nicola Arigliano (to be released this year). She has created and performed the musicals "Martin Luther King Jr. A movement called Freedom", and "The Ebony Diva", a homage to the great female Jazz singers of the United States. Beverly and Antonello hold a Master Class in Cisterna di Latina. You might find her performing at the Micca Club, or The Cotton Club in Rome.

What is the most captivating thing about Rome for you?
The climate. There are those crystal clear sunny days that occur even in January and February when you can have lunch out of doors. lunch! Just today, the last day of January I enjoyed a sun-drenched lunch with a view of St. Peter's. Magical!

Has your coming to stay in Rome enhanced your work experience?
After searching four continents, I met my music director and co-writer in 1999! Working with the great Antonello Vannucchi, a maestro of musical instruments too numerous to mention has been way beyond my expectations. We work in every genre, soak up inspiration from the past, present, future and invent, invent, invent. Our next step is to present our projects abroad.

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
The museum at Palazzo Massimo alle Terme — the top floor. With two dear, dear friends from Great Britain, I recently enjoyed the exquisite ancient frescoes and mosaics from the Terme Diocleziano, not to mention other precious relics from the center of Rome to Flaminio. It doesn't get the lines or the crowds, but it doesn't get better than this for the first class exhibition of rare artefacts.

Where do you go in Rome to chill out?
Home. I have the good fortune to live in an attico on Monti di Creta above the Vatican with a splendid view and a large terrace with fruit trees, yucca, oleander, bougainvillea and wild flowers. In the spring and summer, it's like a trip to the Caribbean! There's no place like home.

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?
Being thanked by the USA for putting the story of Martin Luther King, Jr. onstage in Rome!

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?
Public transport.
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What is your favorite restaurant?
Micci, in Prati on Viale Andrea Doria. Brothers Angelo and Marcello have been friends of mine for ages.

How would someone from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?
If that someone loves and I mean truly loves art, history and Italians, they will be confronted with the biggest dose of beauty and love imaginable. They will experience frustration, charm, laughter, dislike, love — but above all they will live, really live in the most breath-takingly beautiful city outside of the Disney loveliness of Venice.

When is the best time to visit?
My suggestion would be spring or fall. May/June is lovely before the really steamy weather sets in, and then, the end of September/October.

Sienna ReidSienna Reid was born in Port Townsend, Washington and graduated from the University of Washington with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in painting. Five days in Rome with her husband began a love affair with the city. They returned to Seattle, sold their house and came back to Rome to start a new adventure, with their seven year-old son. Their apartment in the Monti district boasts a big terrace for entertaining and planting trees and herbs. In Rome, Sienna paints portraits on commission and creates her own work — images of children, cows, cats, dogs and horses — using colors influenced by the Italian Renaissance. She also runs Italy Hotline Custom and Gourmet Tours, specializing in private guided tours of Rome and Italy, chauffeur services and culinary tours. She is particularly interested in researching the food preparation and recipes of ancient times. Her paintings have been shown in Seattle and in Rome, as well as elsewhere in Italy.

Has coming to stay in Rome enhanced your work experience?
Yes! Living in Rome has brought me in contact with a whole world of art that I had not known existed, although I studied art history for years. For example, I had not seen ancient Roman frescoes or mosaics except in a few reproductions and I find them extremely inspiring. Now that I've had the chance to visit the Vatican Museums and the Sistine Chapel hundreds of times, I have also been inspired by the pagan art I've seen there.

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?

The city comes alive for me in the secret symbolism that exists everywhere in Rome. Immersing myself in this world has opened what I call "The Secret Door", which reveals the city's many mysteries.

Where do you go in Rome to chill out?

I love to go to Piazza Madonna dei Monti one of the most beautiful and fascinating places in Rome, where I relax over coffee, lunch or a drink at the Bottega del Caffe. (They have great mojitos.) I can escape Rome's chaos on my own terrace, where I love to garden or just sunbathe.

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?
The first time I came to Rome with my family, we flew in via Frankfurt on a plane carrying about fifty Italian pilgrims singing loudly. When the plan landed they all began to clap maniacally. It was truly bizarre! We took the train from the airport to the Trastevere station, and as we wandered up the street in search of our hotel, we ran into a large woman with long dark hair who was washing herself in a fountain, with her dress hiked up around her hips and no underwear! Being a passionate fan of Fellini I was quite excited that Rome seemed to be exactly as he had presented it.

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?
There are the usual annoyances of any big city — things like traffic, garbage and dog poo. But the degradation of archeological sites is truly heartbreaking. I find it very difficult to understand or accept. From one year to the next I have seen 2000 year-old mosaic floors buckle out of the ground because of bad restoration and major frescoes crumble to the ground. Rome has a very privileged patrimony which attracts 26 million tourists a year now. The numbers of visitors spending their money here is phenomenal and a big percentage of taxes should be going to the maintenance and preservation of these treasures. I believe that the only solution is to turn over the maintenance of Italy's priceless patrimony to private institutions and universities.

What is your favorite restaurant?
The Taverna dei Fori Imperiali [Via della Madonna dei Monti 16 tel 06 6798643] which I discovered about five years ago. I thought the place was a tourist trap for the first couple of years I lived in the neighborhood but I kept walking past it on the way to work and smelled the most incredible aromas coming out the door into the street. I finally convinced my husband that we had to have dinner there and we were blown away. Their caponata, sauteed zucchinis with mint and bufala appetizer is divine. Their veal and truffle ragu, the tepid salad with prawns and their ravioli filled with spigola are to die for. They have daily specials revolving around the seasons. They also have a good wine selection and they are run by a wonderful family.

How would someone coming from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?
Speaking from my own experience, it has helped me to develop new passions, explore my relationship with the past and present and to partake in a great culinary tradition. It has also helped me to appreciate many things about my own culture. During my first three years here I thought everything was wonderful — even the old ladies cutting in line and battling traffic to cross the street. After my third year in Rome, I began to see more clearly the negative aspects of life here. So many people write books after spending a month here, raving about everything Roman and speaking disparagingly about home but as in every place, there are problems to confront.

When is the best time to visit?
I first came to Rome in the dead heat of summer, which has a certain languorous charm, in spite of all the tourists and the mosquitos! In the early fall and spring the air is fresh and the light is beautiful. I'd avoid Easter because there are too many tourists and it is a nightmare to visit any of the sites, especially the Vatican. I also recommend not coming on a Monday if you have only a few days because that is when cruise ships tend to arrive and the influx of visitors can be overwhelming, especially if you want to see the Vatican, which is also closed on Sundays.

Ren Mattioli was born in Cape Town, South Africa where she grew up until leaving for high school in Switzerland. After graduating, she completed a secretarial course at the Imperial College back in South Africa, packed her bags and went off to London. She worked first at The Economist and later, for an Anglo Italian bank, which led to a job in Sardinia running the bank's property investment office, and then to Rome. She found a little apartment in Passeggiata di Ripetta and as there was a flourishing film industry in the '70s, she became a production secretary. She met and married an Italian in Rome, then went off with him to Milan where she started a small soft furnishing business for children, creating and making her designs in the Brera district and delivering on her bicycle. When she and her husband tired of the grey Milanese skies, they bought and restored an old stone farm house in Tuscany, with acres of ancient abandoned olive trees. While her husband ran the farm, Ren founded MaremmaMaglia, a cottage industry with hand knitters, weavers and embroiderers. Back in Rome, she now teaches cooking classes, taking her clients to local markets then back to her home where they learn to make pasta and simple Italian dishes. And, as she and her husband become experts while growing and pressing their own oil in Tuscany, she organizes olive oil tasting brunches. www.2friends4cooking.com

What is the most captivating thing about Rome for you?
The pink light that reflects off the buildings as the sun goes down; contemplating the winding Tiber at sunset, crossing the various bridges to get differing views of the city; and the the Castrense Amphitheater, hidden in the Aurelian Wall with a monastic garden curated by Cistercian monks where you can buy the fruit and vegetables.

Has coming to Rome enhanced your work experience?
When I lived here in my 20s, yes, because it was a very international city. Now, I find it difficult because the society seems to be closing in on itself instead of opening up globally like the rest of the world and that means narrow mindedness.

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
The Basilica di San Clemente, where you find the best example of Paganism and Christian Rome built one on top of the other with the lovely sound of rushing water coming from a spring from the Roman Aqueduct. Feel the cool water, and if you are there in the heat, you can splash yourself with it and revive. The Pantheon, the umbilicus of history surviving through two millenniums. The Basilica di Santa Maria degli Angeli with the meridian sundial that regulated time for the Romans.

Where do you go in Rome to chill out?
Lots of places: With a vodka tonic in the garden of Hotel de Russie. In August when the heat is on, the quiet garden is a real oasis of peace. Or I take a train from the Piramide station to Ostia Antica and spend the day under the pine trees with a sandwich and newspapers to read. I can chill out amongst the flowers on my terrace; in the Villa Borghese gardens at the café of the Casa del Cinema, where you can sit as long as you like with a book or your computer over an espresso. The Trionfale market is such a buzzling and happy place, where you can see the real Romans selling their food and vegetables. Have a ‘porchetta’ sandwhich made with suckling pork roasted in a wood oven. If you ever get the blues this is the place to go and listen to the banter and feel the good spirits that are always present around food!

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?
Taking my wedding vows in the Campidoglio from the Roman mayor, just next to Marcus Aurelius and baptizing my daughter in the English church in Via del Babuino, where a friend sent us a horse and carriage with a bottle of champagne and glasses hidden under the seat. We crossed Rome with her in her lacy gown down via Condotti and I felt like a film star!!!!

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?
The Rome of today is rude and abrupt and overcrowded, but the immense beauty and pink skies and sunsets iare ever present and I think it important to dwell on that and remember where you are.

What is your favorite restaurant?
I have so many! Da Benito e Gilberto (Via del Falco 19, near the Vatican, tel 06 867769).Small and intimate, delicious fresh fish. La Berninetta (Via Cavallini 14, near Piazza Cavour, tel 06 3203895). Try the light dish of typical Roman fried vegetables and fish, and the very good pizza. It's a Roman family restaurant with excellent service. Colline Emiliane (Via Avignonesi 22, near Piazza Barberini, tel 06 4817538), which serves a cuisine from Reggio Emilia, including fresh pasta and everything is delicious. Il Matricciana (Via dei Gracchi 55 in Prati, tel 06 3212327), a family restaurant with typical Roman cooking.

How would someone from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?
It's a humbling experience to confront the astonishg works of art and architecture that previous civiizations have created. Rome is the gateway to Greco-Roman culture and, with North Africa so near, that influence is felt here, as well.

When is the best time to visit?
The seasons are so mild in Rome, that almost any time of year is good, and as the local cuisine is dependent on fresh produce in season, the culinary experience keeps changing. I would say that perhaps February and March could be a bit less interesting than the rest of the year as far as events are concerned, but you would find the city less full of people.



Elizabeth Helman MinchilliElizabeth Helman Minchilli was born in St. Louis, Missouri and lived there until she was twelve, when she moved with her family to Rome. This instilled not only a love of languages, but also a deep appreciation and undying passion for all things Italian. After moving back to the United States, she finished high school and then went to Boston University, where she majored in Art History. She received her Master's degree at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts. This led her – finally – back to Italy where she spent two years researching her doctoral dissertation on the sixteenth-century Boboli Gardens. Elizabeth continues to live in Italy, with her husband, the architect Domenico Minchilli, and their two daughters. They divide their time between a restored farmhouse in Umbria and a rooftop apartment near Rome’s Coliseum. She contributes to a variety of publications on art, architecture, food, culture and travel and has written six books on Italian life and style. Her most recent is "Italian Rustic: How to Bring Tuscan Charm into Your Home". She has appeared as a travel, food and style expert on the programs "This Old House", "PBS Gourmet’s Diary of a Foodie", "BBC World", Delta In-flight Programs and HGTV. Together with her sister, graphic designer Robin Helman, she founded the new custom publishing firm One Book Press. Elizabeth is the founder of the Friends of the American Academy in Italy, a membership group that promotes the cultural exchange between the community at the American Academy in Rome and those of us who call Italy home.

What is most captivating about Rome for you?
I know it sounds tired, but I am constantly overwhelmed by the city’s beauty. While I love travelling (and travel to some seriously gorgeous places) I am just bowled away every time I come home.

Has coming to Rome enhanced your work experience?
I’ve been very lucky in that respect. As a writer my ‘beat’ has always been beautiful buildings and gardens, interesting people, exciting travel and delicious food. So being in Italy has been not only my resource for subject matter, but enabled me to develop a career covering what I love best.

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
Take the time to walk around Rome, getting lost and discovering hidden alleyways and secluded piazzas.

Where do you go to chill out?
My husband and I love going out for a cocktail. If the weather is wonderful (and it so often is) we love the rooftop terrace at the Hotel Forum.

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?
I can’t pinpoint any one exciting thing. Rather, there are many magical moments: driving home, late at night, on the motorino seeing Rome by moonlight; the view over Rome, right after a storm, from the Gianicolo; taking an early run by the coliseum.

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?
Any big city has its annoying side, and Rome is no different. But for me, the good always outweighs the bad. That’s why I’m still here, after over twenty years!

What is your favorite restaurant?
Oh dear. If I reveal my favorite, that means even more people will go there! But you can visit my web page, www.elizabethminchilli.com. If you go to the links, you’ll find my list of Rome restaurants. I also write about food and more on my blog, at the same site.

How would someone from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?
Well, when I was 12, my family moved to Rome for a year, and look where that got me! Rome gets into your blood, and changes you. It’s a very easy city to step into and so enjoyable on so many levels that its hard leaving.

When is the best time to visit?
I usually tell people to avoid the heat of summer. But there is something to be said about the emptiness of Rome in August, too!

Cynthia Korzekwa grew up in San Antonio, Texas, close to Mexico, bicultural in fact and flavour, as she puts it. She was greatly influenced by Fela, the housekeeper from Piedras Negras who taught her Spanish and introduced her to all the vibrancy of Mexican culture. She began to draw as a small child, and studied Fine Arts and Literature at Trinity University in San Antonio. Tales of Rome told to her by Italian friends inspired her to come here herself, to further her art studies. She has lived in Italy for 25 years, first in Tuscany, with her husband, where she raised her two children. After teaching at the Accademia di Belle Arti in Milan, Florence and Rome, and opened a studio, "Los Ojos" at Via dei Sabelli 169 in the San Lorenzo district.
She has exhibited in America, France, Italy and in Greece, where she maintains a home. She illustrates book covers andhas written and illustrated her own book, "Art for Housewives", an illustrated essay. Her blog Art For Housewives blog was created to link her own immense creative energy with that of other people around the world. Her re-constructed clothing line, called Muy Marcottage, from the French term ‘mar cottage’ (plant propogation), is inspired by the concept of taking one plant to make another, in this case a creation made from pre-existing elements. www.cynthiakorzekwa.org

What is the most captivating thing about Rome for you?
The light. And the way some buildings look as if they’ve been painted with watercolours….soft, faded and slightly decadent. Has your coming to stay in Rome enhanced your work experience? I’m a great fan of John Dewey’s ART AND EXPERIENCE and, as an artist, believe that art making is an extension of one’s personal experience. The more experiences you accumulate, the more you have something to say. Living in a country different than the one you grew up in is transcendental--it forces you to go beyond your own habitual borders. The more options you have of looking at life, the more choices you have, too Living in different places helps one to learn the importance of interrelating—something which is fundamental for a healthy globalization.

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
Gian Lorenzo Bernini’s “Ecstasy of Saint Theresa” (Santa Maria della Vittoria) and, another example of religious ecstasy , the “Beata Ludovica Albertoni” (San Franceso a Ripa). But first, for a real mystical experience, one must read “The Song of Solomon”. Many scholars believe this work greatly inspired Bernini and his idea of mystical marriages.

Where do you go in Rome to chill out?
To relax, I go “work out” at my studio, Los Ojos, in San Lorenzo Do you have a recall of the most memorable thing that happened to you in Rome? It’s where I fell in love with The Man of My Life.

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?
The noise and the smog.

What is your favourite restaurant?
Corsetti Il Galeon, Piazza S.Cosimato 27 (Trastevere tel 06 581.6311) for fish and Sicilia in Bocca, via Flaminia 390 (near Ponte Milvio tel 06 32 40 187, with additional locations in Prati and Trastevere), when calories don’t count.

How would someone from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?
Well, just think of all the art — and the history — in this city. Just walking around Rome with your eyes opened is a cultural happening.

When is the best time to visit?
The spring and the fall.

 

Vincenzo Racana moved to Rome from New York where he had lived, worked and studied for more than 20 years. Like many who have settled in the Eternal City, he was seduced by La Dolce Vita and energized by the myriad possibilities and a one year sabbatical has stretched to a three-year residency, so far. A former Director of Protocol for JPMorgan, Vincenzo has established a bespoke marketing consultancy firm in Rome with an international clientele. He is an active board member for the American International Club of Rome and Chairman of the Finance Committee of St. Paul’s Within the Walls, the American Episcopal Church of Rome.

What is the most captivating thing about Rome for you?
Feeling the history as you find yourself walking through the abundance of amazing historical architecture - and all of the fantastic panoramas to be enjoyed from almost everywhere.

Has coming to Rome enhanced your work experience?
After 20 years in an intensive Wall Street environment, let’s just say that my work experience in Rome makes for a better work/life balance!

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
The view from the Fontana dell’Acqua Paola on the Janiculum Hill, and if you can squeeze it in, the Sunday noon concert at Cappella Paolina in the Quirinale Palace.

Where do you go to chill out?
The Chiostro del Bramante for a coffee or an aperitivo, the Giardino degli Aranci, numerous passaggiate in the centro storico and definitely the sea-side from May until late September.

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?
That I began a new chapter of my life in a different country (and culture) and have made some of the most incredible friends along the way.

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?
Aside from not being able to find a good shoe shine, nothing that would not annoy me in another large international city.

What is your favourite restaurant?
Taverna Quaranta [Via Claudia, 24 behind the Basilica di San Clemente] and Dar Poeta for pizza [Vicolo del Bologna, 45, Trastevere] and Mona Talbott’s cuisine at the American Academy dining room, which is not a restaurant, but some of the most delicious food in Rome!

How would someone from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?
They would learn to be more patient. There is no long term planning and one must use a lot more instinct vs. facts to make decisions.

When is the best time to visit?
The spring or fall, when the weather is at its best and the city is active but not too crowded.

Rochelle CheeverRochelle Cheever was born in Arizona. Soon after her birth, the family, moved to Rome where her parents opened the first health and fitness studios in the city. Being surrounded by all the wonders of Rome from such a young age gave Rochelle an eye for beauty. She went back to the US to study at the Corcoran School of Art in Washington D.C., developing a love of portrait painting, which she now blends with photography. Back in Rome, she has raised three boys and runs a successful photographic portrait business, specializing in on-location family and children?s portraits, using her knowledge of the city's hidden treasures and its magical light to make her pictures special. Rochelle also does on-location wedding photography for "Destination Couples". She has shown her paintings in the U.S. and Italy, notably at Rome?s American Academy in 2002 and the Vittoriano Museum. Amongst the numerous awards she has won throughout the years is the latest Tau Visual award for Children?s Portraits for the Association of Professional Photographers.

What is the most captivating thing about Rome for you?
The colors, beautiful and inspiring backdrops, the textured walls.

Has coming to stay in Rome enhanced your work experience?
Well, I was raised here, so, you might say Rome's aesthetics and classical beauty are deeply ingrained in my artist's soul and DNA. Growing up here is quite a bit different than "staying" or living in Rome. You might divide my dual citizenship as the following: my head is American and my heart/passions are Italian. r

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
Bring your tennis shoes and backpack and camera and LIVE the city by walking it.

Where do you go in Rome to chill out?
To chill out I walk, walk, walk. With over 2,000 years of culture and art there is something to see and learn everyday. Also I chill out at various museums, galleries and their cafés and libraries — the Galleria d'Arte Moderna at the north end of the Villa Borghese, the Palazzo delle Esposizioni on Via Nazionale, the Chiostro di Bramante near Piazza Navona.

What is the most memorable thing that happened to you in Rome?
Too many to list. Rome is such a passionate city that something memorable happens almost daily here.

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?.
Yes, I try to avoid them also so as not to spoil Rome's true beauty: Traffic and rude drivers (avoid by walking as much as possible) A bit too conventional and provincial at times (leave for the States!) .

What is your favorite restaurant?
I'll name two: Il Caminetto and dal Bolognese in Piazza del Popolo.

How would someone from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?
Learn the language, learn another culture and its customs, appreciate beauty. History, especially art history.

When is the best time to visit?
Rome is beautiful throughout the year because of its sunny skies, even when it is cold. However, the month to avoid Rome is July (too hot and humid). August is one of my favourite months, regardless the heat, because it is empty and you can see all the monuments better, and there is no TRAFFIC!


Caron A. McConnon Jr.
was born in Georgetown, Washington DC and raised in Alexandria, Virginia, where she pursued a career in online marketing and business development, seminar and program planning, while raising her daughter, Brittany (now the mother of Caron's granddaughter, Jayla). Caron's love of diversity and travel brought her to Morocco, where she learned Moroccan Arabic, and then to Italy where she fell in love with the language, life-style, fashion and the orientation toward family. After several more visits, she came back to Italy to stay in 2007, armed with seven suitcases and a wedding gown. She and her husband, Nicola Ricciardi, an Italian Navy Commander whom she met in Washington D.C., and married in Italy, have made Rome their home. Caron is currently an Affiliate Marketing Area Manager in Rome for www.Venere.com, part of the Expedia brand of online accommodations, where she handles new Partnership Affiliation agreements and Partnership contract negotiations for her markets. She has also taught Business English at UET, in Rome, within the European Tourism Masters Program.



What is the most captivating thing about Rome for you?
I enjoy living amongst both ancient and modern-times each day. There is an extensive beauty surrounding one famous piazza after another in and around the historic center. I suggest getting out and walking around to fully understand the amazing scenery and historical sites.

Has coming to stay in Rome enhanced your work experience?
It afforded my career the international attention it was longing for! Although I relocated to Rome for love, I have been extremely fortunate to have it all in Bella Roma! Family, friends, wonderful colleagues and a continual fun and exciting global career.

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
Having been fortunate enough to meet some Real Romans in Bella Italia, I have seen first-hand some hidden wonders that regular tourists might not know of and Tom Hanks didn’t show you in "Angels and Demons". I call them my "hidden secrets of Roman life". My favorite should be visited at night, the Piazza dei Cavalieri di Malta, [an amazing view of the city through a grate]. I also recommend the The Cripta dei Cappuccini, Chiostro del Bramante and the fresco trompe l’oeil dome at the Chiesa di San Ignazio.

Where do you go in Rome to chill out?

“On the Rox” in Trastevere, Piazza di San Giovanni Della Malva 14, my favorite “Americana” place to reminisce about home. There is nothing better after a day of playing ball in Villa Pamphili, than to hit this true American style watering hole! Guinness on tap and a friendly English speaking staff waiting for you! Then you have Grotta Pinta Lounge, located at Via di Grotta Pinta 12 [near Campo de' Fiori] for live music and dancing!

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?
Falling backwards into the Trevi Fountain while on vacation and coming back here to stay! Getting engaged on the Spanish Steps, having a fairytale wedding in Rome and building a beautiful villa in Riano. Also having had the joy of sharing this beautiful city with my 90 year-old grandmother, Greta Wolf.

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?
Of course, there are the “normal” relocating difficulties when an Expat decides to make a move, standing in the longest lines ever at a post office to pay a bill! My real concerns focus more around the daily dangers of driving and parking in Rome. There seems to be almost a state of anarchy on the roadways. The good thing is that there are many other forms of transportation like bikes, scooters, trains and metro.

What is your favourite restaurant?
Mama’s in Labaro, Via Flaminia 2. Owned by an Americana, Lara. A friendly, affordable and welcoming place for couples and families to dine out. The music is always easy listening and there is a beautiful patio for a night of dining under the stars. Best to call for reservations (06 33614537).

How would someone from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?
Learning a second or third language is a major benefit for anyone from abroad and Rome has a multitude of free language groups to learn Italian. Try the Extreme Language Exchange started by Andrew Marmion at Mate Bar, Via Benedetta 17, on Thursday night in Trastevere. It is important for people to know that there are a multitude of opportunities in Rome. There seems to be an expanding business influx with companies from abroad seeking new opportunities within the Italian market. The attention to speaking English in the workplace is becoming a must (along with Italian) .

When is the best time to visit Rome?
The April-May period, as the weather starts to get warmer and the city is in an Easter glow. Also the September- November period, which is packed with festivals and wine/cheese tasting events. Rome is quieter in August as most of the Romans head for the coast.

Amii Stewart began studying dance at age 9. At 17, she won a scholarship to attend “Workshops for Careers in the Arts”, the first school for the arts in her native Washington D.C. Before long, she had her own disco single, "Knock on Wood," which sold 8 million copies worldwide and earned her a Grammy nomination. She came to Rome for the first time in 1977 to promote the recording, then settled in London, and began making frequent jaunts to the Eternal City for work and pleasure. With each return visit, she became more fascinated with Rome. The pendulum between Rome and her home in London swung definitively towards Rome in 1983, when she signed a recordinng contract with BMG Italy.
Amii has appeared as prima ballerina, assistant choreographer and assistant director, starring in the Miami and Broadway productions of “Bubbling Brown Sugar”. In the London production of the show, she took on an acting role as well as filling the role of choreographic assistant and assistant to the director. She has toured the U.S., Europe, Mexico, South America, Japan and Canada promoting her albums“Paradise Bird”, “Jealousy”, “Light My Fire” and “I’m Gonna Get Your Love” to name a few. Living a truly international life, she has made guest appearances on television shows such as Merv Griffin, Dinah Shore and Soul Train in the U.S., the Terry Woogan show and others in the U.K., as well as returning guest appearances at Italy's San Remo Festival. She continues her busy career, with theatrical performances, recordings, sound tracks for film and TV productions, and videos, traveling the globe on concert tours and serving as Goodwill Ambassador on behalf of UNICEF.

What is most captivating about Rome for you?
Rome is a museum a “cielo aperto”. Wherever you look there is something that leaves you gasping in wonder. I never get tired of seeing the same “ol” things, because each time, it’s as if I’m seeing them for the very first time; like through the eyes of a child. Amazing….

Has your experience in coming to Rome enhanced your work experience?
In some ways, yes. I would have never had the opportunity to meet, collaborate and be inspired by Oscar-winning maestros such as Ennio Morricone and Nicola Piovani. Never in my wildest dreams could I have imagined becoming the inspiration for the modern opera “Romanza” written by Sergio Rendine for the Teatro del Opera di Roma, I would have never become a Unicef Goodwill Ambassador. I could go on and on….. On the other hand, I miss those cultural and spiritual things I can only acquire through my Afro-American culture in America.

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
The list is too long but I would start with: the Vatican, the Coloseum, the Catacombs, the Forum, Villa Adriana, Terme di Caracalla, Trastevere, Chiesa Santa Maria degli Angeli, tea at the Regent, Piazza d’Spagna and on and on and on………

Where do you go to chill out?
That’s easy… at home, bare footed with friends and a couple of bottles of Laurent Perrier.
If I must go out, then it would be someplace with a great view or that takes me back in time: The bars at the Regent, Excelsior or Harry’s Bar on the Veneto. Then there’s Babbington’s for tea or the cafés at Piazza di San Lorenzo in Lucina.

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?
The first time I caught the sales in the late '80s when there were ‘really’ sales. I still have the clothes I bought from Fendi, Valentino, Armani ... I’m glad I bought them then because it would be an insult to my intelligence to buy them now….The euro has changed the way I look at everything… But the most important of all would have to be the Christmas Concert at the Sala Nervi and the private audience with Pope Paul VI. That day will remain in my heart forever!

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?
Rome is dirty and noisy. The problems could be alleviated, but I guess it doesn’t bother the people here enough to make a change in the quality of life, even though it has drastically changed for the worse since my arrival.

What is your favourite restaurant?
‘Porto Rotondo’ on Via Oslava, ‘Da Felice’ in Testaccio, ’Ai Piani in Parioli and ‘Gobbi’ in Casal Palocco.

How would someone from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?
The world as we know it exists because of what happened in the past. Rome is a great place to begin, but one must see as much of Italy as possible — Venice, Florence, Naples, the Amalfi coast, Tivoli, Sicily…. There is no other country in the world that can offer what one can behold in Italy. The Italians are so used to living alongside these wonders that it takes a straniero to remind them what they pass by without seeing day after day

When is the best time to visit?
The only month to exclude is August. “See Rome and die”, as they say 11 months a year


Chen Clarke
grew up in a small town by the sea in Ireland. Her home was alive with women who made their own beautiful clothes and soft furnishings. She inherited their love of color, textures and fabrics, which led to a successful career in interior design and the start up of the company Inside Story. With the use of Feng Shui, Chen helped people create sacred spaces, allowing for a deeper harmonious connection to their homes and their surroundings. She later founded Image Consultancy and Life Coaching, helping people to change their lives dynamically in many more areas. Her own spiritual journey started at a very young age with a deep interest in the mystical and magical world around her. Following her awareness of something greater out there, she studied and worked alongside spiritual teachers and healers all over the world. Now 25 years later, Chen gives workshops in Italy and abroad teaching the practical methods she has used to enhance and change her own life. Her private sessions with people include body work, coaching, and the tools to create the life they've always dreamed of. She has used these herself to fulfil her own dream to live and work in Rome. www.accesssacredspace.com


What is the most captivating thing about Rome for you?
The colors, architecture and the amazing light that has been inspiring artists for centuries. A perfectly chilled glass of prosecco and a well placed seat to watch the world go by. The Roman curiousity that provides infinite possibilities to strike up interesting conversations with complete strangers in the most mundane places.

Has your coming to stay in Rome enhanced your work experience?
Absolutely! All these years, I've been priviledged to work as a facilitator, healer and therapist, helping people rediscover a balance within themselves and their lives. Being the eternal student of people and human nature, Rome offers a smorgasboard of dramas and intrigues, of relationships between shopkeeper and customer, lovers, families, friends and even between strangers....and the knowledge that beneath the surface we are all searching for the same things, a life that contains love, joy, meaning and purpose...What if the purpose of life was to have fun.... are we having fun yet?

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?

The Trevi Fountain, late at night when it is beautifully lit and there are not many people about; the bustling Porta Portese market on a Sunday morning; and the view of the city through the trees that magically opens up as you walk toward the Japanese water garden in the botanical gardens in Trastevere, a little piece of heaven.

Where do you go in Rome to chill out?

Fregene or anywhere by the sea, particulary in the winter as I find the wild and stormy sea comforting and soothing to mind, body and soul, probably because its like a little piece of home. Although I love when the trees begin to turn and show their glorious autumn colours, gold, russet and orange...so anywhere I can swish through the leaves, listening to the rustling.

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?

I don't know if this falls into the most memorable category, but sometimes when I find myself losing patience with the traffic, how long it takes to get simple things done, and the inevitable red tape, I take a moment to look around at any one of the 1000 spectacular views in Rome that take my breath away and I'm reminded once again how lucky I am to be living in such a beautiful place.

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?
One thing I can't quite get used to, and that is playing chicken with Italian drivers on pedestrian crossings, a fact that was brought home to me on a recent work trip to Australia where, in sharp contrast, the drivers are more respectful of pedestrians and automatically slow down at crossings in case you might want to cross. Here, you need to be in the middle of the road, looking like you mean business. i.e. you won't hesitant to allow them to swerve around you.

What is your favourite restaurant?
Sale e Pepe on viale Trastevere, 106. They make a pasta filled with brie and pear with a rocket pesto that's truly inspired and transports me to another reality.

How would someone from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?
Well any travel is great to round a person out, but living in Rome is unique, unlike other big cities I've lived in. It still has the small community feel to it and a personability that makes for enjoyable everyday living, like a family you feel very much part of. An appreciation for fresh produce, simply prepared that makes for the great food Italy is famous for, and, of course, pasta the ultimate fast food.

When is the best time to visit?
I would suggest May or October, for a more forgiving climate for walking around, the best way to explore the city. Although if you have the time and are prepared to explore in a more leisurely way, indulging in gelato and iced coffee to ward off the sticky heat, or you fall into the category of mad dogs and Englishmen, August can be an easier time to get around town when most Romans head for the hills or the beaches.



Jeannette Montgomery Barron
was born in Atlanta, Georgia and studied at the International Center of Photography in New York. In the 1980s, she became known for her portraits of the New York art world, some of which were published in a book, Jeannette Montgomery Barron (Edition Bischofberger, Zurich, 1989). In 1998, she published a second book, this time a collection entitled "Photographs and Poems", with text by the Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Jorie Graham (Scalo 1998). This was followed by a collaboration with renowned author Edmund White on a third volume, "Mirrors", in which she explored her fascination with the reflective surface (Holzwarth Editions 2004). Her latest works are "Session with Keith Haring" (Holzwarth Editions 2006), twenty photographs taken in Haring’s studio one afternoon in 1985; and the recently completed "My Mother's Clothes, color photographs of her mother's wardrobe. This last book was conceived as a means of communicating with and remembering her mother, who had Alzheimer's disease. An extremely fashionable woman, her mother wore clothes by the great designers of her time for near four decades, from the 1950s through the 1990s. The book will be published in March 2010 by Welcome Books and distributed by Random House. Jeannette Montgomery Barron's works are in numerous public and corporate collections, including The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, The High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Kunsthaus, Zurich and The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh. She has shown internationally at Galerie Bruno Bischofberger, Zurich, Scalo, New York and Zurich, Jackson Fine Art, Atlanta, ClampArt, New York and Magazzino D’Arte Moderna, Rome. She lives in Rome and Connecticut with her husband and their two children.
www.jeannettemontgomerybarron.com

What is the most captivating thing about Rome for you?
The light.

Has your experience in coming to Rome enhanced your work experience?
Yes, absolutely. I never really photographed in color until I moved here, for one thing. I have less distractions here than I had when I worked in New York.

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
The Pantheon, Galleria Borghese.

Where do you go to chill out?
For a coffee in the sun in Piazza Farnese, a ride on my bike in the Borghese Gardens or the beach in Sperlonga.

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?
Watching my children grow up here.

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?
That it takes so long to get things done! But this is something I have finally gotten used to (almost).

What is your favourite restaurant?
I am a creature of habit and tend to go to the same restaurants over and over again. I like being a “regular”. For lunch, Cul De Sac in Piazza Pasquino [near Piazza Navona] — you can sit outside in the summertime. Armando Al Pantheon [Salita de' Crescenzi, 31, tel 06 688 03034] for a great Roman lunch or dinner. Pizzeria Montecarlo on Vicolo Savelli 13 [near Piazza Navona, tel 06 686 1877]. Oh, one more place: La Vecchia Bottega Del Vino in the Ghetto [Via Santa Maria del Pianto, 9a, tel 06 683 01120] is very special for a long, leisurely lunch and a great glass of wine.

How would someone from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?
Learning how to slow down and enjoy some of the most important things in life.

When is the best time to visit?
October is heavenly.




John Nolan
was born and raised in Dublin. He studied at Portobello College, Dublin School of Business, before coming to Rome where he worked as an English teacher at the Berlitz school, an information systems consultant for I & T and European sales manager at TIM before returning to Dublin to open a café and restaurant. But he missed the sun, outdoor living and Roman food. So he came back to Rome, studied the necessary licensing and commercial laws and opened his first off-license wine shop in the San Giovanni district. At Johnny’s, he employs an expert sommelier to help customers select wines, and a beer expert to help them find their way through the hundreds of international labels he stocks. With the success of Johnny's, he has opened a second shop in the Prati area.

What is the most captivating thing about Rome for you?
What the whole of Italy offers is the relationship between geographical areas and their culinary habits and wine production. I think its the only country in the world where food, wine and location are directly related. Rome, on the other hand, gets its claws into you and there's no escaping it.

Has your stay in Rome enhanced your work experience?

Yes, I think after this experience in Rome nothing could surprise me again.

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
The Forum, the Vatican. Rome on a whole is like walking through a museum.

Where do you go in Rome to chill out?
The bar ‘Ma Che Siete Venuti a Fa’ ,Via Benedetta 25, in Trastevere. The best draft beer in Rome is at ‘Brasserie 4.20’ in Via Portuense 82, open until 4 a.m.

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?

My son was born here.

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?
Lots of things, but when in Rome you have to do as the Romans do. I'd advise people to beware of taxis, and cafés around main tourist attractions.

What is your favorite restaurant?

Al Grottino Pizzeria [Via Orvieto 6, San Lorenzo district] and Felice [Via Mastro Giorgio 29, Testaccio district]. Although I am not a vegetarian, the carbonara vegetariana at Betto & Mary, Via dei Savorgnan, 99 [south Rome, east of the Tuscolana train station] is delicious. Many others, too.

How would someone from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?
You learn to appreciate certain things from your own country that you may have taken for granted. And you learn to enjoy life, because that's what Rome is really about.

When is the best time to visit?
April, May, October — or December when there are less tourists, and the Romans are around, so the city doesn't seem like a ghost town as it does in August.


Diane Epstein
was born in New York, but moved with her family to California at a young age. During her high school years, the family moved to London, and then to the San Francisco Bay Area. After receiving her Master of Arts Degree in counseling, Diane moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico, where she was inspired to express her creative side by picking up a camera, while working as a psychotherapist and life coach. She moved to Rome in 1995, with her husband and two young sons. Today, her time is divided between her work as a creative coach, a fine art photographer and as a “photo journey guide”, exploring the creative dimension and the hidden treasures of Italy, including its culinary delights. She has developed a style she calls "fresco photography," created using a technique of layering multiple images of Rome, to design a painterly, textured picture. Diane’s photography will be on permanent display in Rome at the Hotel Babuino 181 in early 2010, as well as at the hotels Mario dei Fiori 37 and Margutta 54. She is now represented by the Susan Calloway Fine Art Gallery in Washington DC and her work will be on display at the Gerald Bland gallery on Madison Ave in New York City in April 2010. Diane has been featured in national and international magazines and TV, including Redbook, Bon Appetit, and the Oprah Winfrey show, "Choosing Your Life." She is working on a book, “Recipe for Living,” which will be both a food odyssey and an inward journey, designed to help readers develop a healthier, more balanced approach to eating and living.
She samples of Diane's work on her website.

What is most captivating about Rome for you?
The ancient mystery that lies beneath the surface, the architectural details, the vivid light. And the sensual textures, the richly-encrusted walls, Rome’s color palette of burnt ochre, sienna, amber glow, and misty blue, which have all inspired me to take the photos that I do.

Has coming to Rome enhanced your work experience?
Yes, my career as a fine art photographer and creative coach has developed over the past 14 years to a point where my professional life is more focused on the expression of creativity —  both mine personally and assisting my clients to develop their own creativity. Over the past dozen years I have transformed my work as a therapist into something that is more in alignment with who I am as a healer, an artist and a guide, one that feels more gratifying and life enhancing. Also, the fact I have Rome as my backdrop, that I am able to go out into the heart of the centro storico and lead people on photo journeys. It’s a dream for me to combine my passion for photography with helping others become more creative, to be the best they can be. What a gift!

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
I would tell them to wander down the narrow alleyways and courtyards off the Piazza Farnese, Campo de’ Fiori and Piazza Navona, without a specific destination or time-frame in mind – and to stay off the big, noisy streets. And I would suggest they bring a sketchpad, a journal or their camera to capture their mood and to keep them focused on the present moment.

Where do you go to chill out?
My local caffe’/bar in Monti, where I can linger with loved ones — let time be long, and, of course, take photographs of anything that calls out to me. But mostly I love to be home cooking with the family. Both my sons have become great cooks and there is nothing like a cozy afternoon or evening, with the aroma and sounds of them cooking and chatting — and then sitting together at the table to eat a delicious Italian meal together. And it doesn’t hurt to be living in such a tranquil, light-filled apartment, surrounded by a monastery and a seminary, and still only a two-minute walk to the piazza, where we can pick up some fresh produce at the frutteria.

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?
Certainly the experience I had with my husband’s life-threatening illnesses – which he endured and overcame. I will never forget some of the harder moments, when both our families were in the hospital room trying to keep it together, laughing and telling stories, and then the moment they wheeled him out and into the operating room — in unison, we all burst out crying. But more importantly, the great healthcare, the community of Italians, Americans, and international friends, and of course our families, stood by us and created a bond of love and support. For me being able to look back and know that this immense heartbreak is now in the past, and that we are both still here to treasure each and every moment – surely this will linger in my memory forever.

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?
I think what bothers me most is the mentality, whether it is Roman or not, which perpetuates the notion that one can’t do anything new, so why try. And what often goes along with that is the complaining and stagnancy, the thinking that doesn’t allow new things in, that holds people back from living life to the fullest. Still, I can see it changing, especially in the art world.

What is your favorite restaurant?
I have many. Taverna dei Fori Imperiali which is being renovated for the New Year, and is moving down the street on Via della Madonna dei Monti is one. And my newest find — perhaps the décor is a bit over the top, but the service is not stuffy, and the seafood is great – is Sa Tanca on Via Palermo. It can be a place to really splurge but I hear they also have a budget lunch that only locals know about.

How would someone from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?

They would look at the world with different eyes. For me it’s been about appreciating the complexity and depth, the textural beauty and timeless nature. I would hope that time would seem longer, that space would be shared, and that they would be able to be more aware of history and of the world, where people are not just like them.

When is the best time to visit?
Autumn and spring are usually lovely. But I also recommend off-season months, like February or even Christmas time, when winter in other places can be colder and harder, and Rome can be mild and festive.

 

Rosa Manocchio was born and raised in Buffalo, New York, which, she points out, is one of the coldest cities on earth with the good old teams, the Buffalo Bills and Buffalo Sabres. Her parents were both born in the Molise region of Italy, and met at an Italian dinner dance in Toronto, Canada. The summers Rosa and her sister spent at their second home in Molise created a life-long infatuation for all things Italian. She dreamed of moving back to the "mother country" when she grew up, and she did everything in her power to achieve this goal. After graduating from SUNY Brockport with a degree in International Business and Spanish, she went to work for Alitalia in New York City. She segued into sales and marketing, for American Express Publishing's Travel & Leisure Magazine and for LB Media. Feeling that a part of her was missing, she decided to make the big move to Rome and is now European Director of three travel magazines published by Bonnier Corporation. Her clients are luxury hotels and spas in all of Europe, giving her the good fortune to travel a lot, visiting amazing properties and meeting incredible people. She feels blessed to be here and, as she puts it, "living by the Vatican does that to you and I will continue to live my dream and look forward to every day ahead in the most magical city in the world!"

What is the most captivating thing about Rome for you?
The Trevi Fountain — I tear up every time!

Has coming to stay in Rome enhanced your work experience?
Yes, it gave me the opportunity to work with greater autonomy, which is very important at the management level. Also, Rome has taught me to enjoy the beauty of life without constantly thinking about the next business transaction.

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
The Angelus at the Vatican, Sunday's at noon.

Where do you go in Rome to chill out?
Campo dei Fiori and Trastevere. Sometimes when I want to relax, I walk over to the Vatican and read, sitting by the piazza, facing St.Peter's Basilica. It's enchanting.

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?
Meeting my boyfriend at the Coliseum the evening Andrea Bocelli had performed...it was very romantic!

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?
The nuns are not too friendly! Which would be the opposite of what one would think ... Also, it is a little disappointing that they don't decorate the streets more for the Christmas holiday.

What is your favourite restaurant?
Trattoria Vecchia Roma at San Giovanni [via Ferruccio 12 B/C, tel 06 446 7143]! Their specialty is Bucatini all'Amatriciana, prepared inside a pecorino cheese bowl. To die for!

How would someone from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?
Culture, culture, and more culture!

When is the best time to visit?
I love Rome during the fall months. However, for a tourist the summer months are fun because it is not too crowded and you can attend cultural events that are organized along the Tiber River.

Lisa R. Tucci is an American who has been living in Italy for nearly 18 years, pursuing her life’s passion — producing multimedia content and audio/videoguides for museums and churches, piazzas and palaces throughout the country. She is the founder and Chief Creative Officer of Art&Media Communications, which professes to ‘producing the best of Italian culture since the Renaissance’ offering downloadable audioguides of Italy’s finest places (www.touringtracks.com). When she’s not basking in the beauty & antiquity of Italy, or walking her dog Trevor in its gorgeous parks, she writes an irreverent blog about Italy’s uglier underbelly: burntbythetuscansun.blogspot.com

What is most captivating about Rome for you?
The fact that you’re walking on the same stones (at least the ones not yet asphalted over) of so much that has gone before you.

Has your experience of coming to Rome enhanced your work experience?
Well, I work producing audioguides for museums and city tours. And while Italy boasts over 3000 museums, and is an open air museum itself, being closer to Rome’s Ministry of Culture and all the people in its orbit is definitely good for me.

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
The Doria Pamphilj Gallery, where the audioguide is narrated by Prince Jonathan Doria Pamphilj himself. It is the only collection still presented in its entirety out of Papal decree (and the gallery has been rehung as it was in the late 1700s). It is truly a step back in time. And, the best part, it’s right on the Via del Corso.

Where do you go to chill out?
In the summer, I love the terrace of the Galleria d’Arte Moderna on via delle Belle Arti, right near Villa Borghese.
In the winter, the Chocolate Factory SAID in the San Lorenzo area.

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?
Now – that’s a tough one! It seems living in Rome – every experience is memorable…it’s like you’re constantly shooting the movie of your life. But, aside from the times I get to run around Rome with my tiny nephews and nieces, I’d say seeing the absolutely awesome fireworks displays from a friend’s terrace over Castel Sant’Angelo both on the festival of Saints Pietro & Paolo and New Year's Eve was pretty unforgettable. But, that’s in my adult life. As a child, I will never forget the Sound & Light show in the Forum, and I believe it’s the reason I live here today. I obviously have a thing for pyrotechnics.

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?
Where do you want me to start? I write a whole blog about that! I would say that the most disturbing thing about living here, in what I believe is the most beautiful city on the entire planet (and believe me, I get around!) and a city that was acknowledged as ‘The Most Green’ in Europe a few years back, is the active disdain for trees as part of our environment. They are being cut down willy-nilly, never to be replanted and leaving little half-columns of stumps in their wake. It is disgraceful, adds to global warming, and, when you hear those chain saws of the (dis) Servizi Giardini winding up, very depressing. That, and the fact that you can’t find your way to the Auditorium or on the Tangenziale easily because they simply don’t put up the signs at the one major intersection where you need to make a left turn.

What is your favorite restaurant?
That’s like asking what my favourite food is (answer: all of the above). My favourite closed, so I’ll tell you where I go to have the best pasta cacio e pepe (pasta with cheese and black pepper) in town: da Carlone on via della Luce in Trastevere, not the crazy side.

How would someone from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?

There is no greater experience than living abroad, seeing how things are different, seeing historic sites, opening your mind, learning a language, and travel travel travel. As my notebook states, “The world is a book and those who don’t travel only read a page” (St. Augustine).

When is the best time to visit?
It’s always a good time to visit here! But, try and avoid the crowds at Easter.

 

Rick Breco grew up in the beach towns near Los Angeles. After college, where he majored in Theater Arts, he decided to visit Hawaii for a couple of months, and stayed ten years. The famed hairdresser Paul Mitchel had moved his operation to Honolulu, and Rick, who had decided to turn his creativity in that direction, becoming Mitchell's personal assistant, training with him, later studying with Vidal Sasson. He went on to work at salons in Honolulu, eventualy becaming a trainer himself, as well as the style and grooming director for PanAm Airlines. He finally got ?Rock Fever? and moved to Northern California?s wine country to open hs own salon, Breco?s, which was voted the most successful business in the Bay area by Good Morning San Francisco TV show. He became involved in the community, starting programs for ?"at risk yout"?, helping the young to keep off the streets, winning awards in recognition of his accomplishments. He moved south Laguna Beach, California, where he spent 18 years. Here, in addition to his salon and community involvement, he returned to his interest in theater, becaming a founding board member of the non-profit No Square Theatre, which raised money for local organizations and charities. He also founded Silent Productions, a deaf (and hearing) production company to raise monies for deaf charities, primarily for deaf kid?s camps in California.
Eventually, he formed formed a partnership with his California co-workers, Giuseppe and Massimo Topo, moving to Rome to open Noi Salon in Piazza del Popolo.?Women?s Wear Daily sited Noi as the number one colorists in Italy, and it has become a favorite among ex-pats and Italians alike. www.noisalon.com

What is the most captivating thing about Rome for you?
The 24/7 in-your-face beauty. The beauty of the color, the light, the buildings, the piazzas, the Italian people, and of course the food.

Has living in Rome enhanced your work experience?
Enhanced? On the contrary! Italy does everything it can to discourage small business. I?ve never worked so hard for so little in my life!

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
I would have to say the Chiesa di Sant? Ignazio near the Pantheon. That ceiling and those chapels, wow!

Where do you go in Rome to chill out?
On stage. It gives me a chance to not have to be one of the faces of Noi, at least for a few hours. We are lucky to have a couple of English language theater companies here in Rome, so I get plenty of chances to escape and ?chill out?.

What is the most memorable thing that has happened to you in Rome?
Probably the first time I stood on a bridge and saw the Tiber. I mean ?it was the Tiber?, Caesar and Cleopatra, everything I read about my whole life. Here I am, living in history! I feel it in my bones everyday when I walk down the street, it?s magic here.

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?
THE TOTAL LACK OF CUSTOMER SERVICE!

What is your favorite restaurant?
That would hands down be Charreada in Piazza dei Quiriti in Prati. Being from LA I have to have my Mexican fix, and Charreada is the best we have. Trust me I?ve been to them all. It?s good ol? border Mex complete with the guy blowing the whistle selling tequila shots.

How would someone from abroad benefit by coming to Rome for a few years?
They would definitely learn patience.

When is the best time to visit?
In August, during the Ferragosto holiday when the city is empty.


Not enhanced, my concept of work had to be altered drastically to remain here.

What would you tell a visitor not to miss in Rome?
My favourite Museums are Palazzo Massimo [Largo di Villa Peretti 1], which has the best preserved frescoes, giving me a sense of just how resplendent a Roman home was. The other is the Exhibition of ‘Gods & Machines’ at the first Roman power station, in Via Ostiense 106, where the juxtapositions of fine ancient sculpture set against 18th century machinery is mesmerising. There is never anyone there... A hidden treasure!

Where do you go to Rome to chill out?
My terrace.

What was the most memorable thing that happened to you in Rome?
Producing ‘A Broad Abroad’ and I will come to tell you why!

Is there something that annoys you about Rome?
The Kafkaen order of moving from A to B.

What is your favourite restaurant?
Ristorante Monte Arci, Via Castelfidardo 33 [near Stazione Termini]. Scrumptious wood baked fresh fish.

In your opinion, does a foreigner benefit from the experience of living in Rome?
The intestines and the brain are the first two organs of the body to benefit from a Roman experience.

When is the best time to visit?

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In Rome Now Travel Guide: Profiles